Workers' Compensation Benefits May Cover This Explosion

If you have family in Indiana, then you may have heard about the explosion at a General Motors plant there. Many people in Ohio have family members or friends who work in this or other factory plants, and this kind of explosion is always possible, although unlikely with proper safety procedures. The reports state that there was one person killed in the blast, a worker employed by a General Motors contractor.

The reports state that the explosion was a chemical explosion, but it did not say what kind of chemicals were released during the blast besides chlorine dioxide. The accident took place at the metal-stamping plant in Marion, Indiana, where five workers were injured and the contractor, a 48-year-old man, was killed. The facility is known for providing blanks, sheet-metal assemblies and stampings for cars, trucks and vans to GM assembly plants all across the United States.

There are approximately 1,600 workers at this plant, and with an incident like this, you could wonder how safe it is to work in this kind of environment. An investigation will be completed, but so far, it's been determined that the explosion was likely caused by chlorine dioxide. The reason for the incident is still unknown, since the chemical should not have been exposed in a dangerous manner.

The news reports that while the 48-year-old man was killed, five others suffered from injuries that ranged in severity. Those injuries were not considered to be life-threatening, but three employees had to be either sprayed down or washed in showers before taking them to the hospital for treatment. Rinsing is generally common after being exposed to potentially dangerous chemicals.

When accidents like this take place, you may have a right to compensation through workers' compensation or other sources. You might have to miss work or go through costly medical exams, and you shouldn't have to worry about finances while you recover.

Source: USA Today, "1 dead in chemical blast at Indiana GM," July 1, 2014

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